LCEC – Lee County Electric Cooperative

Due to global supply chain disruption, new service requests could be delayed.

The Power Cost Adjustment increase is a result natural gas price costs passed on from our power supplier.

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Become a pro at portable generator safety

Become a pro at portable generator safety

May 26, 2022 – Storm season starts in less than a week, and that means that power outages may occur if strong weather heads our way. If you power your home with a portable generator during electrical outages, it is imperative to consider the serious health and safety risks to you, your neighbors, and unsuspecting line crews working in the area if not operated properly. Keep the following in mind to protect yourself and others this storm season:

  • Before you buy a generator, determine how much electricity you need for your home. Be sure to buy the right size generator.
  • Read the operating instructions carefully before operating the generator.
  • Do not connect a generator directly to your home’s electrical system. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never use a generator indoors or in an attached garage. Keep in an open, well ventilated area outside and away from open windows.
  • Buy a battery-operated carbon-monoxide alarm, which will alert you if carbon monoxide levels become dangerous.
  • Do not touch a generator if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Consult an electrician if you have any questions about the safe operation of your generator.

Visit lcec.net for more tips for staying safe around electricity, and to download the LCEC Hurricane Guide.

Glass and windows play a big role in energy usage

May 19, 2022 – Did you know that 30 percent of the summer cooling costs in Southwest Florida are attributed to glass and windows? For those with tons of glass and windows in your dwelling, it is essential to understand the role that glass and windows play in allowing solar heat to enter your home in our summer-dominant climate.

All transfer of heat energy occurs as the result of convection, conduction or radiation:

Convection occurs when heat energy, embodied in a substance, usually air, moves from place to place as the embodying substance moves.

Conduction occurs when heat energy moves from molecule to molecule through a substance. The greater the difference in temperature, the greater the flow of conducted heat.

Radiation is the process by which most heat energy enters homes in Southwest Florida. Every object embodies or stores heat energy and some of this heat energy leaks away in the form of infrared radiation or radiant heat.

Along with understanding how heat enters our home, LCEC energy experts suggest the following tips to stay cool while keeping your electric usage under control:

  • Significant air-conditioning savings can be attained by blocking solar heat before it reaches the windows, or by using special heat-reflecting glass or heat-reflecting glass coatings (residential window tint).
  • Reflective glass or reflective glass coatings should be rated to reflect at least 65 percent of all solar heat to be considered efficient in Southwest Florida.
  • Internal window coverings trap solar heat between them and the window glass until the heat energy warms the air in that space. The heat-laden air flows up to the ceiling, where it waits for the air conditioner to cycle on and draw it in through the filter. This creates an illusion of efficiency when, in fact, the load on the air conditioner has not been altered.
  • Awnings, storm shutters, shade trees and porch or lanai roofs are all very effective in blocking solar heat. To be 100 percent effective, the exterior shading device must never allow direct sunlight to touch the window’s surface.
  • East or west windows are the main source of intrusive heat. It is recommended to use shading devices and tint on east and west windows since they experience many hours of direct sunlight.
  • South-facing windows experience a great deal of direct sunlight in the winter months when the sun rides lower in the sky. In the summer, south-facing windows are largely shaded by the overhanging soffit of the roof.
  • Skylights experience many more hours of direct sunlight than any vertical window and should be avoided if possible.
  • It is difficult to utilize shading devices to block the sun from entering skylights. Existing skylights can be tinted, covered, blocked or shaded to lessen their load on the air conditioner.
  • When upgrading windows, consider energy-efficient features such as double-pane, low-E glass as well as type of frame material.

Visit lcec.net for more ways to save on your energy consumption!

Beat the heat with tips from LCEC

May 4, 2022 – As hot as it feels now, summertime will bring even hotter temperatures to sunny SWFL. LCEC recommends taking simple steps now to beat the heat:

  • When cooling your home, set the thermostat at 78 degrees Fahrenheit. Each degree below adds 8 to 12 percent to the cooling costs.
  • While away from home for more than two hours, set the thermostat at 83 degrees Fahrenheit. If there is a pet in the home, leave thermostat at 82 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Install a smart thermostat that will automatically raise and lower the temperature at certain times of the day.
  • Be sure your thermostat fan switch is set on the “auto” setting. This is more economical for temperature and humidity control.
  • Do not close A/C vents or interior doors when A/C is running.
  • Service your air conditioning system annually.
  • Repair duct leaks using metal foil tape reinforced with mastic adhesive.
  • Check air conditioner filters monthly and change as needed.
  • Turn fans off when the room is not occupied. Each continuously running fan costs approximately $7 per month on your electric bill.
  • Run pool pumps for a maximum of 8 hours a day in the summer, and 6 hours per day in the winter, unless you are heating the pool.
  • Install reflective window tint/film that will reflect 65 percent or better on windows facing east, west or south. LCEC also recommends installing awnings, storm shutters and planting shade trees.

In addition to taking steps to beat the heat while keeps electric costs low, now is the time to prep for storm season which starts June 1. Visit the Storm Center page on lcec.net to download the LCEC Hurricane Guide and to learn more about storm restoration. Visit the Energy Efficiency tab for simple and free ways to save on your energy usage.

LCEC Rates Remain Low – May Power Cost Adjustment

May 2, 2022 – A Power Cost Adjustment (PCA) increase will be implemented for LCEC customers on their May bill. The increase is the result of rising purchased power costs passed on from the LCEC power supplier, Florida Power and Light (FPL).

PCA charges are determined after consideration of projected costs for purchased power. When purchased power costs decline the PCA is decreased. Since 2014, there have been five PCA decreases. There are no margins (profit) earned on power costs which makes up more than 70 percent of the LCEC bill.

Even with the power cost adjustment, LCEC rates remain competitive within the region. LCEC customers have not seen a base rate increase in 13 years. The base rate is the portion of the bill that LCEC is able to manage through efficiencies, technology, and a close watch on the bottom line.

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