LCEC – Lee County Electric Cooperative

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The Power Cost Adjustment increase is a result natural gas price costs passed on from our power supplier.

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LCEC Restoration Update – Sept. 30 – 6 a.m.

LCEC Restoration Update – Sept. 30 – 6 a.m.

September 30, 2022 – 6 a.m. – LCEC was able to restore power to some customers yesterday and 11 percent currently have power. LCEC employees are working around-the-clock to restore power to customers. Customers do not need to call LCEC as we are aware of what circuits are without power.

Current restoration numbers are as follows:

A.M Area UpdateCust. OnCust. OutTotal Cust
Marco Island019,58219,582
Immokalee5,65810,08215,740
Carnestown2373,0023,239
Lehigh Acres7,01426,11233,126
North Fort Myers056,27956,279
Cape Coral094,27694,276
Pine Island07,3987,398
Sanibel010,94610,946

The catastrophic damage from Hurricane Ian is something that has not been experienced before and there are many developments that are new when we consider the widespread flood damage and inaccessibility to some of our barrier islands. LCEC has upward of 300 line crews and 135 tree trimming crews with additional crews arriving this weekend.

Widespread power outages – damage assessment today

September 29, 2022 – Just over 90 percent of LCEC customers are without power today. In accordance with utility best-practices, damage assessment will take place throughout the six-county service territory today and into tomorrow. More than 500 crews and additional LCEC field employees began evaluating the entire electric grid to determine the quickest strategy to energize main circuits this morning. Depending on their ability to navigate flooded areas, downed bridges, debris, and vegetation, this could take more than one day.

What can customers do?

  • Stay away from downed power lines.
  • Turn off the main breaker to their home/business.
  • Operate generators safely
  • Help neighbors
  • Do not call to report an outage – utilities know the power is out and are working as quickly, safely, and smartly to restore power.

LCEC Power Update

September 29, 2022 – Just over 90 percent of LCEC customers are without power today. In accordance with utility best-practices, damage assessment will take place throughout the six-county service territory today and into tomorrow. More than 500 crews and additional LCEC field employees began evaluating the entire electric grid to determine the quickest strategy to energize main circuits this morning. Depending on their ability to navigate flooded areas, downed bridges, debris, and vegetation, this could take more than one day.

What can customers do?

  • Stay away from downed power lines.
  • Turn off the main breaker to their home/business.
  • Operate generators safely
  • Help neighbors
  • Do not call to report an outage – utilities know the power is out

and are working as quickly, safely, and smartly to restore power.

Generator safety tips from LCEC

Wind and debris from Hurricane Ian could cause power outages. Crews are ready to respond and LCEC does not expect extended outages requiring backup power supply. For those customers planning to use a generator, safety is of the utmost importance. Please consider the following tips to keep you, your family, and utility workers safe while using a generator:

  • Don’t connect your generator directly to your home’s wiring at the breaker panel or meter or a regular household outlet. Connecting a portable electric generator directly to your household wiring can be deadly to you and others. A generator that is directly connected to your home’s wiring can ‘back feed’ onto the power lines connected to your home. You could also cause expensive damage to utility equipment and your generator.
  • The only safe way to connect a portable electric generator to your existing wiring is to have a licensed electrical contractor install a transfer switch. The transfer switch transfers power from the utility power lines to the power coming from your generator.
  • Connect individual appliances that have their outdoor-rated power cords directly to the receptacle outlet of the generator, or connect these cord-connected appliances to the generator with the appropriate outdoor-rated power cord having a sufficient wire gauge to handle the electrical load.
  • Don’t overload the generator. Do not operate more appliances and equipment than the output rating of the generator. Overloading your generator can seriously damage your valuable appliances and electronics. Prioritize your needs. A portable electric generator should be used only when necessary, and only to power essential equipment.
  • Never use a generator indoors or in an attached garage. Just like your automobile, a portable generator uses an internal combustion engine that emits deadly carbon monoxide. Be sure to place the generator where exhaust fumes will not enter the house, in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes to the home, and protected from direct exposure to rain, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.
  • Do not store fuel indoors or try to refuel a generator while it’s running. Gasoline (and other flammable liquids) should be stored outside of living areas in properly labeled, non-glass safety containers. They should not be stored in a garage if a fuel-burning appliance is in the garage. The vapor from gasoline can travel invisibly along the ground and be ignited by pilot lights or electric arcs caused by turning on the lights. Avoid spilling fuel on hot components. Always have a fully charged, approved fire extinguisher located near the generator.
  • Turn off all equipment powered by the generator before shutting down your generator.

Generator safety tips from LCEC

September 27, 2022 – Wind and debris from Hurricane Ian could cause power outages. Crews are ready to respond and LCEC does not expect extended outages requiring backup power supply. For those customers planning to use a generator, safety is of the utmost importance. Please consider the following tips to keep you, your family, and utility workers safe while using a generator:

  • Don’t connect your generator directly to your home’s wiring at the breaker panel or meter or a regular household outlet. Connecting a portable electric generator directly to your household wiring can be deadly to you and others. A generator that is directly connected to your home’s wiring can ‘back feed’ onto the power lines connected to your home. You could also cause expensive damage to utility equipment and your generator.
  • The only safe way to connect a portable electric generator to your existing wiring is to have a licensed electrical contractor install a transfer switch. The transfer switch transfers power from the utility power lines to the power coming from your generator.
  • Connect individual appliances that have their outdoor-rated power cords directly to the receptacle outlet of the generator, or connect these cord-connected appliances to the generator with the appropriate outdoor-rated power cord having a sufficient wire gauge to handle the electrical load.
  • Don’t overload the generator. Do not operate more appliances and equipment than the output rating of the generator. Overloading your generator can seriously damage your valuable appliances and electronics. Prioritize your needs. A portable electric generator should be used only when necessary, and only to power essential equipment.
  • Never use a generator indoors or in an attached garage. Just like your automobile, a portable generator uses an internal combustion engine that emits deadly carbon monoxide. Be sure to place the generator where exhaust fumes will not enter the house, in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes to the home, and protected from direct exposure to rain, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.
  • Do not store fuel indoors or try to refuel a generator while it’s running. Gasoline (and other flammable liquids) should be stored outside of living areas in properly labeled, non-glass safety containers. They should not be stored in a garage if a fuel-burning appliance is in the garage. The vapor from gasoline can travel invisibly along the ground and be ignited by pilot lights or electric arcs caused by turning on the lights. Avoid spilling fuel on hot components. Always have a fully charged, approved fire extinguisher located near the generator.
  • Turn off all equipment powered by the generator before shutting down your generator.

Stay safe!

Power outages may occur from Hurricane Ian

September 27, 2022 – For more than 82 years LCEC crews have been restoring power quickly when Southwest Florida storms hit. An automated mapping and facility management system provides line crews with instant information through lap-top computers installed in their vehicles. This is just one LCEC tool that improves reliability and restoration time.

LCEC’s line crews are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week to brave severe weather, life threatening situations and unique environmental challenges to ensure the lights stay on. They use the proper safety equipment and emphasize safe work practices. It is important for customers to be aware of the following safety measures also:

  • Do not touch downed power lines.
  • Do not step in water near a downed power line.
  • Do not touch a person who has come in contact with an energized power line. Call 911.

Customers can rest assured that LCEC line crews will hit the pavement as soon as it is safe following Hurricane Ian to restore any power disruptions. We will work around-the-clock to restore customers as quickly as possible!

LCEC is ready for Hurricane Ian

September 27, 2022 – LCEC thoroughly prepares long before a hurricane threatens to make landfall in Southwest Florida. To ensure LCEC has the resources needed for restoration, the organization cultivates relationships with power line and tree-trimming contractors, fuel companies, material vendors, food service vendors, other cooperatives and local agencies for back-up resources.

In addition, the nearly 400 LCEC employees each play a critical role in the restoration plan. Employees put their typical job responsibilities on hold to pitch in during restoration.

Restoration Priorities

LCEC has a detailed restoration plan that outlines priorities of electric restoration during large power outages. LCEC’s plan first calls for restoration of essential services such as hospitals, traffic signals, shelters, law enforcement. Next, power is restored to the largest number of customers. The last to be restored are services that need to be reconnected after repair to their home electrical system or individual services.

LCEC does not disconnect power before a storm; unless directed by government officials. The utility lets Mother Nature run her course, and begins to restore power once the area is safe again for our workers.

How customers should prepare for outages

  • Ensure that you have battery back-up’s and/or back-up phone’s that are dependent on electricity.
  • Have a battery-powered radio on hand and a supply of fresh batteries to stay aware of news and other information.
  • Keep a flashlight and extra batteries handy.

What to do when the lights go out

  • Help keep LCEC’s telephone lines clear for emergency calls. Only call LCEC at 656-2300 to report downed power lines.
  • Visually check your weather-head (on the roof where your service drop connects to the pole) and your meter box to make sure it is not damaged.
  • Any damage to your home’s electric system must be repaired by a licensed electrician and inspected by a designated agency before power to your home can be restored.
  • Turn off your appliances.  This will protect them when service is restored, prevent electrical fires and lessen the chances of circuit overload when service is restored.  You may leave one light on to serve as a visual signal that power has been restored.

Storm Safety Tips

  • Stay clear of downed power lines. They may still be energized and dangerous. Puddles of water contacting downed lines are just as dangerous.
  • Don’t trim trees or remove debris located near downed power lines. If you must remove debris from your home, don’t pile it under or near electrical lines or equipment.
  • Residents on life support need to have an alternate plan in place to ensure the continuity of any life-support needs. This may include making special arrangements to spend time with a friend or relative during an outage or using a back-up generator.
  • If operating a portable generator, keep it outside and in an open area that is well ventilated. Carbon monoxide emissions can be harmful. Follow all instructions regarding safe operation. Do not connect the generator directly to your main electrical panel. If installed incorrectly, power could flow into outside lines and injure you, your neighbors or utility crews working in the area.
  • Avoid detaining LCEC employees or contractors while they are working to restore power. This can be distracting, can cause an accident and impedes the process.

LCEC provides Environmental Funding Awards to nine local organizations

September 21, 2022 – LCEC announced that it will provide Environmental Funding Awards to ArtFest Fort Myers, Audubon of SWFL, Cape Coral Animal Shelter, Cape Coral Wildlife Trust, Inc., Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife, CROW, J.N. Ding Darling, Friends of the Cape Coral Environment and Monofilament Busters. Since the inception of the LCEC Environmental Funding Award program in 2013, LCEC has bestowed nearly $240,000 to local organizations to support them in their endeavors to protect our precious environment.

This funding is awarded twice a year with deadlines happening on March 15 and September 1. To apply for an environmental funding award, organizations should visit www.lcec.net/about-lcec/community-and-education/environment to download the application. This Environmental Funding Award Program is just one of the many ways that LCEC positively impacts and supports wildlife and the environment. To learn more, visit the Environment page at www.lcec.net or contact pr@lcec.net.

Register now for the 11th Annual LCEC Goblin Gallop 5k/Kid Run to benefit the United Way

September 15, 2022The 11th Annual LCEC Goblin Gallop 5k/Kid Run to benefit the United Way is happening October 29, 2022 at Jaycee Park in Cape Coral. In addition to the in-person 5k/Kid Run, there is a virtual race option happening now through October 29. Packet pickup will be held on October 27 and 28 at the Run Shoppe in Cape Coral. Visit uw.lcec.net for race information including the registration link. Contact 5k@lcec.net with questions.

Since its inception, the Goblin Gallop has raised nearly $24,000 to benefit the United Way! LCEC sincerely thanks all the sponsors, volunteers and participants who make the Goblin Gallop a spooktacular success for the United Way!

Just say no to hand washing dishes

September 8, 2022 – The days of hand washing dishes are long gone and for good reason. Not only is hand washing dishes time consuming, it wastes water and contributes to your energy consumption. According to ENERGY STAR, using a dishwasher can save you more than $40 a year verses washing dishes by hand. Below is the dish on the benefits of using your dishwasher:

Saves times:
If you’ve ever washed and dried a load of dishes you know it takes time and patience. In fact, ENERGY STAR estimates that you could be spending nearly 230 hours (almost 10 days) of personal time handwashing dishes in just one year!

Cleans better:
Dishwashers these days have all sorts of bells and whistles to sanitize even the dirtiest dishes while using minimal water and energy.

Saves water:
Using a dishwasher can save nearly 5,000 gallons of water per year in comparison to hand washing!

Below are some tips from the LCEC energy experts on how to use your dishwasher in the most energy efficient way:

  • Use the energy-saving cycles whenever possible.
  • If your dishwasher has a booster heater, turn your water heater thermostat down to 120 degrees. Most dishwashers have built-in heaters to boost the water temp up to 140-145 degrees.
  • Resist the temptation to pre-rinse dishes. Dishwashers today do a thorough job of cleaning. Just scrape off the excess food and let the dishwasher do the rest. Dishwashers use between 8 to 14 gallons of water per load so save water and electricity by not pre-rinsing.
  • Wash only full loads and refrain from hand washing dishes throughout the day. It’s cheaper to put the dishes in the dishwasher and wash them all at once.
  • Load the dishwasher according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Remember to fill the racks to maximize energy and water use, but make sure you leave enough room for the water to circulate.

Visit lcec.net for more ways to save.

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