LCEC – Lee County Electric Cooperative


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Protect your pets from electric hazards

Protect your pets from electric hazards

September 29, 2020 – Pets get into everything around the house, but don’t let their curiosity get them injured or, even worse, killed! Pet-proofing your home is a necessity to protect your beloved pets. Below are some simple tips for keeping your fuzzy family members safe:

• Be sure that all plugs are completely in their wall sockets. You do not want a wet nose, paw and tongue coming into contact with exposed prongs.
• Watch your cords for fraying or damage from nibbling. If unplugging cords is not an option and your furry friend is seeking out electrical cords, consider coating them in pet deterrent which is available at pet stores or wrap the cords in a cable or PVC.
• Never leave any electrical items plugged in near water!
• Do not allow your pet near lamps. If your pet loves lamps too much to keep them away, consider a low-heat lamp so there is less chance of fire if it is knocked over.
• Keep your furry friends away from cords behind your computer or television. It may be warm and cozy for them, but the risk is too great with all of those cords and electrical connections. If possible, set up comfy area for your pet that is completely free of electricity. This would be the ideal spot for their crate, bed, toys, etc.

Pet-proofing a home is just as important to baby-proofing since our “kids” rely on us to keep them safe! For more tips on electrical safety and more, visit lcec.net.

Are your windows and glass upping your energy usage?

September 22, 2020 – You may be surprised to learn that upwards of 30 percent of your cooling costs is attributed to glass and windows. Even though today marks the start of fall, the weather in sunny Southwest Florida is hot pretty much year-round. Consider the following tips from our energy experts about your home’s window and glass to potentially cut down on your electric usage:

• Significant air-conditioning savings can be attained by blocking solar heat before it reaches the windows, or by using special heat-reflecting glass or heat-reflecting glass coatings (residential window tint).
• Reflective glass or reflective glass coatings should be rated to reflect at least 65 percent of all solar heat to be considered efficient in Southwest Florida.
• Internal window coverings trap solar heat between them and the window glass until the heat energy warms the air in that space. The heat-laden air flows up to the ceiling, where it waits for the air conditioner to cycle on and draw it in through the filter. This creates an illusion of efficiency when, in fact, the load on the air conditioner has not been altered.
• Awnings, storm shutters, shade trees and porch or lanai roofs are all very effective in blocking solar heat. To be 100 percent effective, the exterior shading device must never allow direct sunlight to touch the window’s surface.
• East or west windows are the main source of intrusive heat. It is recommended to use shading devices and tint on east and west windows since they experience many hours of direct sunlight.
• South-facing windows experience a great deal of direct sunlight in the winter months when the sun rides lower in the sky. In the summer, south-facing windows are largely shaded by the overhanging soffit of the roof.
• Skylights experience many more hours of direct sunlight than any vertical window and should be avoided if possible.
• It is difficult to utilize shading devices to block the sun from entering skylights. Existing skylights can be tinted, covered, blocked or shaded to lessen their load on the air conditioner.
• When upgrading windows, consider energy-efficient features such as double-pane, low-E glass as well as type of frame material.

For more ways to save on your energy usage, visit lcec.net.

Auto accidents and power lines

September 15, 2020 – Should you be involved in or witness an auto accident involving power lines, it is essential to know what to do to save your life or the life of someone in need. LCEC reminds all drivers to remember to:

Stay in car:
If your car comes in contact with a power pole/line, do NOT leave the car. Your car and the surrounding area of the accident scene could be energized. If you leave the car, you could become the electricity’s path to the ground which could result in serious injury or death from electric shock. It is equally important to not allow bystanders to help as they could be seriously injured or killed.

Dial 911:
Call 911 immediately who will alert the responsible utility. Both will come to your aid ASAP!

Wait for the OK:
Do not exit your car until a utility or emergency worker gives you the OK. The only reason to exit your car is if it on fire. If your car is on fire, jump clear of the vehicle with your feet together and hop away with your feet remaining together.

Remain calm:
Accidents can be scary! Do your best to remain calm and listen to the instructions of the emergency and utility personnel. The more upset and frazzled you get, the worst the situation will be.

As we juggle new responsibilities such as working remotely, home schooling and selectively leaving our homes during this pandemic, it is more important than ever to focus all of your attention on the road when you are driving.

For more safety tips, visit lcec.net. Safe driving!

LCEC provides five local organizations with Environmental Funding Awards

September 8, 2020 – LCEC announced that it will provide Environmental Funding Awards to Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife, Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, Future Forestry Corporation, Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum, and the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife. Collectively, these five organizations are being awarded more than $17,000! LCEC’s Environmental Funding Awards are given out twice a year with deadlines happening in March and September. An application can be downloaded at https://www.lcec.net/about-lcec/community-and-education/environment. Interested organizations must meet certain criteria to be considered for the award including being located within LCEC service territory, funding utilized for projects/programs related to the environment and the utility industry, and having a demonstrated need for funds. These funding awards are just one of the many ways that LCEC positively impacts and supports wildlife and the environment.

Ways to save as the world works remotely

September 1, 2020 – As much of the world has turned to remote work as a result of COVID-19, homes have now become offices. But just because you are spending more time at home doesn’t mean your electric usage has to skyrocket. One simple trick to keep your electric costs low while tackling your remote work is to power down your computer when you are not using it. If shutting down your pc is not an option, LCEC energy experts recommend that you put your computer in sleep mode whenever possible.

Below is the cost difference for keeping your desktop computer with an LCD screen on 24/7 for all 365 days in a year:
• Fully powered: approximately $89
• Sleep mode: approximately $20

Below are some additional ways to save when it comes to your computer:
• Power off monitor if you will be away from your computer for more than 20 minutes.
• Power off your computer and monitor if you will be away from your computer for more than two hours.
• Ditch your desktop for a laptop which uses substantially less electricity.
• Look for the Energy Star logo when purchasing electronics.

For more ways to keep energy costs low while sheltering and working from home, visit the Energy Efficiency tab on lcec.net.

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