LCEC – Lee County Electric Cooperative


At LCEC, our employees and our customers are our number one priority and we are taking the responsibility of protecting them with the utmost importance. We are laser-focused on official COVID-19 updates and following recommendations. (Read more in our News section)

Shopping Cart


Protect your kids from outdoor electrical hazards

Protect your kids from outdoor electrical hazards

July 28, 2020 – COVID-19 has forced the world to limit outings and stay at home. Many people are embracing the outdoors as a means of getting sunshine, exercise and shaking off cabin fever. No one loves the outdoors and summertime like kids! As kids explore the outdoors, it is imperative for parents to remind kiddos of the following outdoor electric safety rules:

  • Kids should keep an eye out for overhead power lines and electrical equipment, and never climb on or play near either.
    • Avoid climbing trees near power lines. Even if a tree doesn’t seem to be touching a power line but is near one, that branch could make contact if more weight is added to a branch.
    • Only fly kites and remote-controlled airplanes in large open areas far away from power lines. If your kite happens to get stuck in a tree near power lines, do not climb it to free your kite. Call your electric utility for help. If you are an LCEC customer, please call 239-656-2300. It is also important to never fly a kite when a thunderstorm is looming.
    • Never, ever climb a utility pole or tower. Electricity is carried through utility poles and towers and has the potential to kill.
    • Steer clear of electric substations which house dangerous, high-voltage equipment. If a pet or toy makes it inside of a substation, call you utility provider immediately.
    • Water and electricity do not mix!!

Visit lcec.net for more information on electrical safety and more! LCEC wishes all kids a happy and safe end of summer!

Preparing your home for a storm

July 21, 2020 – Storm season is in full swing so if your home is not storm-ready, now is the time to prepare! The most important precaution you can take to reduce damage to your home and property is to protect the areas where wind can enter. Below are tips to help you storm-harden your home:

• Protect your windows with hurricane shutters or plywood.
• Trim dead branches from trees and shrubs around your home, avoiding those close to power lines.
• Clear your patio and yard of furniture, potted plants, toys and other debris.
• Anchor items that cannot be taken inside.
• Turn off and unplug the TV before lowering an antenna or satellite dish.
• Protect your electronics with surge protection devices.
• Reinforce your garage door at its weakest points.
• Inspect doors and add extra locks or slide bolts.
• Inspect and secure mobile home tie downs.

In addition to preparing your home for a storm, it is essential to have your family’s disaster plan and kit ready. For all you need to know about before, during and after a storm, download the LCEC Hurricane Guide from lcec.net.

LCEC reminds generator owners to use caution during storm season

July 14, 2020 – ‘Tis the season…storm season that is! If you plan on using a generator in the event of a power outage, it is essential to know and follow these safety tips:

• Don’t connect your generator directly to your home’s wiring at the breaker panel or meter.
Connecting a portable electric generator directly to your household wiring can be deadly to you and others. A generator that is directly connected to your home’s wiring can ‘backfeed’ onto the power lines connected to your home. Utility transformers can then “step-up” or increase this backfeed to thousands of volts—enough to kill a utility lineman making outage repairs a long way from your house. You could also cause expensive damage to utility equipment and your generator.
• The only safe way to connect a portable electric generator to your existing wiring is to have a licensed electrical contractor install a transfer switch. The transfer switch transfers power from the utility power lines to the power coming from your generator.
• Never plug a portable electric generator into a regular household outlet. Plugging a generator into a regular household outlet can energize “dead” power lines and injure neighbors or utility workers. Connect individual appliances that have their outdoor-rated power cords directly to the receptacle outlet of the generator, or connect these cord-connected appliances to the generator with the appropriate outdoor-rated power cord having a sufficient wire gauge to handle the electrical load.
• Don’t overload the generator. Do not operate more appliances and equipment than the output rating of the generator. Overloading your generator can seriously damage your valuable appliances and electronics. Prioritize your needs. A portable electric generator should be used only when necessary,
• Never use a generator indoors or in an attached garage. Just like your automobile, a portable generator uses an internal combustion engine that emits deadly carbon monoxide. Be sure to place the generator where exhaust fumes will not enter the house. Only operate it outdoors in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes to the home, and protected from direct exposure to rain and snow, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.
• Use the proper power cords. Plug individual appliances into the generator using heavy-duty, outdoor-rated cords with a wire gauge adequate for the appliance load. Overloaded cords can cause fires or equipment damage. Don’t use extension cords with exposed wires or worn shielding. Make sure the cords from the generator don’t present a tripping hazard. Don’t run cords under rugs where heat might build up or cord damage may go unnoticed.
• Read and adhere to the manufacturer’s instructions for safe operation. Don’t cut corners when it comes to safety. Carefully read and observe all instructions in your portable electric generator’s owner manual.
• To prevent electrical shock, make sure your generator is properly grounded. Consult your manufacturer’s manual for correct grounding procedures.
• Do not store fuel indoors or try to refuel a generator while it’s running. Gasoline (and other flammable liquids) should be stored outside of living areas in properly labeled, non-glass safety containers. They should not be stored in a garage if a fuel-burning appliance is in the garage. The vapor from gasoline can travel invisibly along the ground and be ignited by pilot lights or electric arcs caused by turning on the lights. Avoid spilling fuel on hot components. Put out all flames or cigarettes when handling gasoline. Always have a fully charged, approved fire extinguisher located near the generator. Never attempt to refuel a portable generator while it’s running.
• Turn off all equipment powered by the generator before shutting down your generator.
• Avoid getting burned. Many generator parts are hot enough to burn you during operation.
• Keep children away from portable electric generators at all times.

Visit lcec.net for more helpful hints on storm preparation and much more.

LCEC receives “Gold Stethoscope” recognition from the IVR Doctors

July 7, 2020 – LCEC was recognized as both the top electric cooperative and the top in functionality in the 16th Annual Energy Utility Benchmark Report on Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems, released today by IVR Doctors. The 2020 Report compares 100 energy utility automated telephone systems in the U.S. and Canada.

The “Gold Stethoscope” recognition was awarded to winners in 12 categories and LCEC is honored to take home two of the top honors.

“The Report looks at the IVR experience from two-perspectives – callers using it and those who manage it. It also highlights common design mistakes and demonstrates clearly how those errors can have a negative impact on a company and its customers’ experience,” said Mark Camack, IVR Doctors’ co-founder.

The Report identifies automated telephone systems that successfully balance company objectives and customer preferences in three key rating categories: functionality, usability, and aesthetics, the major drivers of customer satisfaction and system utilization.

“No other benchmark report with such a consistent set of design principles has been in place and proven effective in the utility industry over the 16 years of this Benchmark,” said Peter Brandt, IVR Doctors co-founder. “Correlation between top-performance in this Report and a utility’s own internal performance measures is very high.”

IVR Doctors has more than 30 years of market research, usability consulting, marketing, and call center management experience, specializing in automated phone system diagnostics and optimization. Their practice, with an energy utility specialty, is not limited to a single industry and covers companies large and small.

Hawkins named Director of Engineering and Electric Operations

July 2, 2020 – Clark Hawkins was recently promoted to the top leadership position in the LCEC Electric Operations division. Hawkins has 38 years of experience in the electric utility industry including 23 years at LCEC with supervisory and managerial responsibility of various work groups and departments within the Electric Operations Division. His new responsibilities include directing the planning, design, construction, operations, and maintenance of the transmission, substation, and distribution facilities. In addition, Hawkins plays a key role in the development of corporate strategic and vision planning, and the policy and procedure decision-making processes, including labor relations and bargaining unit negotiations.

LCEC customers reporting scammers

SCAM ALERT!
July 1, 2020 – Scammers are busy targeting utility customers today. Residents and businesses are encouraged to remain aware, know the facts and safeguard personal information. Utilities will not call and request personal or financial information over the phone, send an email, or show up and request payment at the door. If something does not feel right, customers should contact LCEC immediately at 239-656-2300.

Scammers might:
• Pretend to be an LCEC representative to get into your home.
All LCEC employees and contractors carry a photo identification badge and can provide work documents with corporate contact information. Ask to see proof and call LCEC to verify, if you are in doubt.
• Solicit personal information over the telephone or through the mail on behalf of LCEC.
DO NOT share personal or financial information unless you initiated the call.
• Request immediate cash, “gift card”, or debit card payment in person.
DO NOT purchase a debit card under threat of service disconnection and NEVER meet someone demanding in-person bill payment.

Reported Phone Scam
Scammers are using false phone numbers that appear to originate from LCEC on caller ID. They may also use a recording of LCEC customer care phone messages to sound authentic. The dishonest caller is threatening to disconnect power unless a payment is made immediately with a Green Dot MoneyPak card. LCEC will never call and demand credit card information or accept Green Dot MoneyPak cards as payment. This scam has impacted utility customers across the nation for several years now.

Report fraud or scams
Victims of a scam can contact the local law enforcement fraud unit or the authorities listed below:
• Financial Crimes Enforcement Network
• Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force
• Federal Trade Commission (File a complaint online)

If you have been a victim of fraud or identity theft, it is critical that you take the following actions:
• 1. Call your financial institutions and credit card companies to inform them
• 2. File a police report and get a copy of it for your records
• 3. Call one of the three major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax or TransUnion) to report it and place an alert on your account. The agency you contact will notify the other two bureaus
• 4. If your Social Security card or number is stolen, call the Social Security Administration
• 5. Change the PIN (personal identification number) and password to all of your online accounts
• 6. File a complaint and an Identify Theft Affidavit with the Federal Trade Commission
• 7. Make a record of the situation and the actions that you took to resolve the issue

NOTICE: You are leaving the LCEC website

By selecting the “Continue” button below you will be leaving the LCEC website and entering a website hosted by another party. Please be advised that you will no longer be subject to, or under the protection of the LCEC website Privacy Policy, and that LCEC is not responsible for the content or accuracy of the information on the website. We encourage you to review the privacy policy on the site you are entering before providing any personally identifiable or confidential information.

NOTICIA: Usted está saliendo de la página de internet de LCEC.

Seleccionando el boton “Continuar” ud. estará saliendo de la página de internet de LCEC e ingresará a una página de internet acogida por una compañia tercera. Por favor note que ud. no estará sujeto a o bajo la protección y reglas de privacidad de la página de internet de LCEC. LCEC no es responsable por el contenido y veracidad de la información en la página de internet. Antes de proceder y proveer cualquier información personal o confidencial, le sugerimos que revise las reglas de privacidad en el sitio de internet al que ud. está ingresando.